Keller High School’s Trash Problem

Keller+High+School%27s+Trash+Problem

Meleah York, Assistant Editor

Walking back from the restroom during my 2A class period one day, I noticed that on the wooden stage of the Commons there were plates of half-eaten fruit and unopened milk cartons, napkins strewn about and straws obviously flicked out of cups, as there were apple juice drops soaking into the light wood of our newly built stage. Before I could fully form a thought, one of our awesome custodians climbed up to clean the mess, and while I appreciated her dutiful act, the whole ordeal made me think. There were literally trash cans three feet away from the stage, and these kids already had to walk in that direction for class, so heaven forbid they throw away their trash as they leave. That’s just about the craziest thing I’ve ever heard.

Here’s what I’m trying to get across with all this sarcasm: Keller High School is not your house or bedroom. This isn’t your own personal area to trash as you please. If you make a mess, you clean it up, or if it’s a big spill, find a custodian and take responsibility. Guys, we literally just got a huge renovation of this school, and we take it for granted by leaving our trash on tables or not cleaning up our messes. How hard is it to pick up a Goldfish you dropped and throw it away so it doesn’t get stepped on and make a bigger mess for our custodians?

Which brings me to another point. Our custodians already do so much for this school, like clean up nasty bathrooms, muddy hallways, the messy commons, and do countless other behind-the-scenes jobs to make our school run. Throwing away chips dropped on the floor or wiping up drink spills prevents the custodians from having to do extra work than they need to, so that they don’t have to stay late and can get home to their families as soon as possible. If everyone could take responsibility for their own messes, our school would not only look nicer, but our custodians wouldn’t have to go out of their way to clean up after you. Ya’ll. We are 14 to 18 years old. You want your teachers and/or parents to stop treating you like a little kid? Clean up after yourselves. I promise you, it’s not that hard.

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